Scone Recipe

Rosemary Garlic Goat Cheese Scones
Jessica Martell and Zackary Vernon

Makes approx. 16 small scones

Ingredients
1 ¼ cup all purpose flour
2 tsp sugar
1 Tbsp baking powder
2 oz very cold butter
2 tsp very cold milk
2 tsp very cold buttermilk
½ tsp salt
1 tsp roasted garlic, smushed into a paste*
1 tsp roasted garlic oil, from roasting the garlic
1 Tbsp chopped fresh rosemary
3 oz. very cold, crumbly goat cheese (find one with a dry consistency)

*Roasting garlic is easy. Place a whole head, unpeeled, into a ramekin and fill it with a decent olive oil. Cover with foil, and bake in an oven at 400F for about 20 minutes, or until it is bubbling and nicely browned. Let the garlic cool, and then squish out the soft cloves and mush them into a paste. It’s a great addition to other bread doughs, especially ciabatta, pizza dough, and savory scones. The olive oil is now nicely infused with garlic for use in other creations.

Preheat the oven to 375F.

Combine in the mixing bowl of an electric mixer:
1 ¼ cup all purpose flour
2 tsp sugar
1 Tbsp baking powder

Briefly mix in, until just pebbly:
2 oz very cold butter

Quickly mix in:
2 tsp very cold milk
2 tsp very cold buttermilk

Quickly mix in:
½ tsp salt
1 tsp roasted garlic paste
1 tsp roasted garlic oil
1 Tbsp chopped fresh rosemary
3 oz. very cold, crumbly goat cheese
(you can adjust these to taste)

Ideally, the dough won’t be finely blended, with little chunks of butter and cheese throughout. It will also be quite sticky, which is fun but requires a dusting of flour to be workable. Roll the dough out on a well-floured surface until it is about ¾ inch thick. Cut out your shapes. A cookie cutter or an empty can will give you circles — I used a 2” diameter can — or you can cut the dough into long strips, then cut the strips into squares, and then halve them to create rustic triangles. Continue to roll out the remainder until you have none left.

Bake at 375 F for approx. 8-9 minutes if small, 10-12 minutes if larger. I’d watch them and take them out at the first hint of browning, as they pass quickly into that too-dry, too-crispy territory.

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